MORE THAN 5,000 RHINOS HAVE BEEN POACHED IN SOUTH AFRICA SINCE 2010. ONE RHINO IS KILLED EVERY 6 HOURS. RHINOS WILL BE EXTINCT IN THE WILD BY 2024, IF WE DO NOT ACT NOW.

 

lucille

 

Put it down to Facebook. A post made Lucille Moore aware of the plight threatening the existence of one African species.

“I saw a Facebook post on rhinos” the young conservationist said. “And I wanted to do something to help. I have always liked rhinos and elephants.”

With more than 4000 rhinos poached in South Africa since 2010, Lucille set her mind to raising money for the endangered animal. Her first fundraiser on an Instagram account raised $300 by selling homemade bath bombs, scrubs and bookmarks to friends and family. She has also taken part in Pub 2 Pub and had craft stalls at Warringah community markets. Her efforts have raised $1000 which she donated to The Australian Rhino Project.

The organisation aims to fly 90 African rhinos from South Africa to Australia and establish a population so the species survives. Lucille’s contribution has secured a position as a rhino guardian. The Australian Rhino Project founder Ray Dearlove said it was support from fundraisers such as Lucille that would ensure future generations would still be able to see rhinos in their natural habitat.

“Lucille is a passionate and determined young lady who we are proud to have in our team of rhino guardians,” he said. “The Australian Rhino Project is building an insurance population of rhinos in Australia so that future generations will be able to view rhinos in the wild.”

The Year 9 student from St Luke’s Grammar school will share her conservation message at school next week.

“Dad and I are training for a half marathon in May and we’re looking for sponsors,” she said.

 

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How Can You Help?

You can help The Australian Rhino Project in so many ways. If we are to achieve our goal of having a secure breeding herd of rhinos in Australia, we will require funding, so any donation that you can make will be extremely welcome.

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News & Events

Ray Dearlove Steps Down

28/11/16 | The Australian Rhino Project team and board would like to advise that Ray Dearlove has stepped down from his position on the board and from the operational team of the Australian Rhino Project for personal reasons. Ray will remain a member of the organisation.

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Featured Stories

Let us not look back in anger, but forward with fury. It is impossible to overemphasise the importance of having a decent white and black rhino population surviving in Australia,particularly as the habitat in certain parts of Australia, thanks to the African exotic introductions, is just made for the rhino."     DR IAN PLAYER

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